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CHASE 2020

13th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering
(CHASE 2020)
An ICSE 2020 Workshop
A Virtual Workshop
Day 1 ("Atlantic"): 1 July 2020 at 16:00-19:00 UTC
Day 2 ("Pacific"): 2 July 2020 at 06:00-09:00 UTC

Update 18 June 2020:
CHASE 2020 program published (see below).

Update 2 June 2020:
CHASE 2020 will have two days organised as thematic sessions with discussions focusing on topics covered in accepted papers. There will also be video presentations from paper authors as well as slides presented in a virtual reality space. More information will be published very soon. Note: CHASE 2020 registration will open on 10 June 2020 at the main ICSE 2020 web site.

Update 7 May 2020:
CHASE 2020 will be organized as an online workshop around the ICSE 2020 dates. More information will be published as soon as it is available.

Update 6 May 2020:
ICSE 2020 has been rescheduled and will be held as a virtual conference. The CHASE 2020 organizing committee is considering what this means for CHASE 2020. Please follow the updates on the ICSE 2020 web site for more information. More detailed information on CHASE 2020 will be published as soon as it is available.

Update 16 March 2020:
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, CHASE 2020 is rescheduled following the rescheduling of ICSE 2020. The CHASE 2020 organizing committee is following the situation and taking the necessary steps to organize the workshop in a safe manner. Please follow the updates on the ICSE 2020 web site for more information. More detailed information on CHASE 2020 will be published as soon as it is available.

Workshop Overview

The software industry is experiencing dramatic changes: distributed software development is done in an agile way; agile methodologies scaled to meet the requirements to support projects with several hundred developers, and frequently deploying software which leads to continuous development practices. As software engineering practices evolve, the Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering (CHASE) change as well. It is crucial to understand current and emerging software practices, processes, and tools and their impact on important local and global issues. In turn, this enables us to design tools and support mechanisms that improve software creation and maintenance, customer communication, and the use and evolution of deployed software systems

CHASE will provide a forum for both exploring new directions, presenting mature research, and discussing early results. This will be the 13th in a series of workshops held at ICSE focusing on this theme. Based on our experience, it will be a meeting place for the academic, industrial, and practitioner communities interested in this area, and will give opportunities to present and discuss works-in-progress.. 

The visualization of CHASE history and CHASE authors' network can be viewed in the following link: http://chasevis.azurewebsites.net/.

Workshop Program

The workshop program is split into two 3-hour sessions, held over Zoom (see your author or participant information email for details on how to join). Each session starts with opening statements from paper authors, followed by a discussion in which all participants are invited to attend.

In addition to the sessions, posters and longer presentation videos will be available online. We encourage all participants to get familiar with the papers before the discussion sessions!

The posters will be displayed in the CHASE 2020 virtual hub, where participants can see and discuss the posters. Poster discussion will also take place in the CHASE 2020 Slack workspace. Links to poster presentation videos are posted in the program below. See your author or participant information email for details on how to access the hub and Slack workspace.

1 July 2020
 Time (UTC)
Event (Zoom)
 16:00 Welcome
 16:00 - 16:45
Session 1: Distributed Development
Session chair: Teresa Baldassarre

Opening statements by:
Karina Kohl, Bogdan Vasilescu and Rafael Prikladnicki: Multitasking Across Industry Projects: A Replication Study (slides, video)
Leticia Machado, Igor Steinmacher, Sabrina Marczak and Cleidson De Souza: How Online Forums Extend Complement Task Documentation in Software Crowdsourcing
(slides, video)
Alexandre Lazaretti Zanatta, Leticia Machado, Igor Steinmacher, Rafael Prikladnicki and Cleidson R. B. de Souza: Strategies for Crowdworkers to Overcome Barriers in Competition-based Software Crowdsourcing Development
(slides, video)
Awdren Fontão, Bruno B. P. Cafeo, Bruno Bonifácio, Rodrigo Pereira dos Santos and Arilo Claudio Dias-Neto: Understanding Developer Relations (DevRel) practitioners’ motivations for using software repositories
(slides, video)
Jens Bæk Jørgensen, Kim Henning Jönsson, Sofie Aaskov Nielsen, Christoffer Øland Skovgaard, Johan Rugager Vase, Mohamed Ghonemi and Rasha Adel Hassan: Requirements Engineering in Implementing IT Support for Scandinavian Healthcare Work Processes Using Outsourced Development in Egypt

(slides, video)
Discussion
 16:45 - 16:50
Break
 16:50 - 17:20
Session 2: Testing
Session chair: Fabian Fagerholm

Opening statements by:
Nicolas Nascimento, Alan R. Santos, Afonso Sales and Rafael Chanin: Behavior-Driven Development - A case study on its impacts on agile development teams
(slides, video)
Mary Sánchez-Gordón, Laxmi Rijal
, and Ricardo Colomo-Palacios: Beyond Technical Skills in Software Testing: Automated versus Manual Testing (slides, video)
Luiz Fernando Capretz, Shuib Basri, Maythem Al-Adili and Aamir Amin: What Malaysian Software Students Think about Testing? (slides, video)

Discussion

 17:20 - 17:35
Break
 17:35 - 18:10
Session 3: Information Seeking
Session chair: Andrew Begel

Opening statements by:
Chris Brown and Chris Parnin: Comparing Different Developer Behavior Recommendation Styles 
(slidesvideo)
Christine T. Wolf and Drew Paine: Sensemaking Practices in the Everyday Work of AI/ML Software Engineering (slides, video)

David Kutas, Aditya Nair, Prerna Singh, Emily Kan, Janet Burge and Andre van der Hoeck: Linecept: Preliminary Design and Implementation of a Timeline-Based Design Coordination Tool 
(slidesvideo)
Paige Rodeghero: An Exploratory Field Study of Programmer Assistance-Seeking during Software Development (slides, video)

John Anvik and Akalanka Galappaththi: Are Automatic Bug Report Summarizers Missing the Target?
(slides, video)

Discussion

 18:10 - 18:15
Break
 18:15 - 18:45
Session 4: Education
Session chair: Igor Wiese

Opening statements by:
Alex Dekhtyar, Bruno da Silva and Karson Slocum: Educating Project Stakeholders: A Preliminary Report (slides, video)
Lavinia Paganini and Kiev Gama: A preliminary study about the low engagement of female participation in hackathons
(slides, video)
Nick Papadakis, Ayan Patel, Tanay Gottigundala, Alexandra Garro, Xavier Graham and Bruno da Silva: Why Did your PR Get Rejected? Defining Guidelines for Avoiding PR Rejection in Open Source Projects
(slides, video)

Discussion

 18:45 Closing day 1


2 July 2020
 Time (UTC)  Event (Zoom)
 06:00 Welcome
 06:00 - 06:30
Session 5: Information seeking
Session chair: Teresa Baldassarre

Opening statements by:
Abir Bouraffa and Walid Maalej: Two Decades of Empirical Research on Developers’ Information Needs: A Preliminary Analysis
(slides, video)
Vladimir Kovalenko, Egor Bogomolov, Timofey Bryksin and Alberto Bacchelli: Building Implicit Vector Representations of Individual Coding Style
(slides, video)

Discussion

 06:30 - 06:35
Break
 06:35 - 07:05
Session 6: Social of SE
Session chair: Yvonne Dittrich

Opening statements by:
Frederike Ramin, Christoph Matthies and Ralf Teusner: More than Code: Contributions in Scrum Software Engineering Teams
(slides, video)
Kashumi Madampe, Rashina Hoda, John Grundy and Paramvir Singh: Towards Understanding Technical Responses to Requirements Changes in Agile Teams
(slides, video)
Lynn von Kurnatowski, Tobias Schlauch and Carina Haupt: Software Development at the German Aerospace Center: Role and Status in Practice
(slides, video)

Discussion

 07:05 - 07:20
Break
 07:20 - 08:05
Session 7: Software Qualities
Session chair: Helen Sharp

Opening statements by:
Sigurdur Gauti Samuelsson and Matthias Book: Towards Sketch-based User Interaction with Integrated Software Development Environments (slides, video)
Per Lenberg, Robert Feldt, Lucas Gren and Lars Göran Wallgren Tengberg: Behavioral Aspects of Safety-Critical Software Development
(slides, video)
Irum Rauf, Dirk van der Linden, Mark Levine, John Towse, Bashar Nuseibeh and Awais Rashid: Security but not for security's sake: The impact of social considerations on app developers' choices 
(slides, video)
Davoud Mougouei: Engineering Human Values in Software through Value Programming
(slides, video)

Discussion

 08:05 - 08:10
Break
 08:10 - 08:40
Session 8: Learning
Session chair: Fabian Fagerholm

Opening statements by:
Christoph Matthies, Franziska Dobrigkeit and Guenter Hesse: Mining for Process Improvements: Analyzing Software Repositories in Agile Retrospectives
(slides, video)
Lakshmi T G and Sridhar Iyer: Teaching-learning of software conceptual design via function-behaviour-structure framework
(slides, video)
Rohit Mehra, Vibhu Saujanya Sharma, Vikrant Kaulgud, Sanjay Podder and Adam P. Burden: Immersive IDE: Towards Leveraging Virtual Reality for creating an Immersive Software Development Environment
(slides, video)

Discussion

 08:40 - 09:00
Closing day 2

List of Accepted Papers

  • Luiz Fernando Capretz, Shuib Basri, Maythem Al-Adili and Aamir Amin. What Malaysian Software Students Think about Testing?
  • Jens Bæk Jørgensen, Kim Henning Jönsson, Sofie Aaskov Nielsen, Christoffer Øland Skovgaard, Johan Rugager Vase, Mohamed Ghonemi and Rasha Adel Hassan. Requirements Engineering in Implementing IT Support for Scandinavian Healthcare Work Processes Using Outsourced Development in Egypt
  • Karina Kohl, Bogdan Vasilescu and Rafael Prikladnicki. Multitasking Across Industry Projects: A Replication Study
  • Mary Sánchez-Gordón (Østfold University College, Norway), Laxmi Rijal (Østfold University College, Norway), Ricardo Colomo-Palacios (Østfold University College, Norway). Beyond Technical Skills in Software Testing: Automated versus Manual Testing
  • Vladimir Kovalenko, Egor Bogomolov, Timofey Bryksin and Alberto Bacchelli. Building Implicit Vector Representations of Individual Coding Style
  • Frederike Ramin, Christoph Matthies and Ralf Teusner. More than Code: Contributions in Scrum Software Engineering Teams
  • Nicolas Nascimento, Alan R. Santos, Afonso Sales and Rafael Chanin. Behavior-Driven Development - A case study on its impacts on agile development teams
  • Per Lenberg, Robert Feldt, Lucas Gren and Lars Göran Wallgren Tengberg. Behavioral Aspects of Safety-Critical Software Development
  • David Kutas, Aditya Nair, Prerna Singh, Emily Kan, Janet Burge and Andre van der Hoeck. Linecept: Preliminary Design and Implementation of a Timeline-Based Design Coordination Tool
  • Kashumi Madampe, Rashina Hoda, John Grundy and Paramvir Singh. Towards Understanding Technical Responses to Requirements Changes in Agile Teams
  • Irum Rauf, Dirk van der Linden, Mark Levine, John Towse, Bashar Nuseibeh and Awais Rashid. Security but not for security's sake: The impact of social considerations on app developers' choices
  • Chris Brown and Chris Parnin. Comparing Different Developer Behavior Recommendation Styles
  • Sigurdur Gauti Samuelsson and Matthias Book. Towards Sketch-based User Interaction with Integrated Software Development Environments
  • Davoud Mougouei. Engineering Human Values in Software through Value Programming
  • Alexandre Lazaretti Zanatta, Leticia Machado, Igor Steinmacher, Rafael Prikladnicki and Cleidson R. B. de Souza. Strategies for Crowdworkers to Overcome Barriers in Competition-based Software Crowdsourcing Development
  • Christoph Matthies, Franziska Dobrigkeit and Guenter Hesse. Mining for Process Improvements: Analyzing Software Repositories in Agile Retrospectives
  • Christine T. Wolf and Drew Paine. Sensemaking Practices in the Everyday Work of AI/ML Software Engineering
  • Lakshmi T G and Sridhar Iyer. Teaching-learning of software conceptual design via function-behaviour-structure framework
  • Lynn von Kurnatowski, Tobias Schlauch and Carina Haupt. Software Development at the German Aerospace Center: Role and Status in Practice
  • Leticia Machado, Igor Steinmacher, Sabrina Marczak and Cleidson De Souza. How Online Forums Complement Task Documentation in  Software Crowdsourcing
  • Awdren Fontão, Bruno B. P. Cafeo, Bruno Bonifácio, Rodrigo Pereira dos Santos and Arilo Claudio Dias-Neto. Understanding Developer Relations (DevRel) practitioners’ motivations for using software repositories
  • Paige Rodeghero. An Exploratory Field Study of Programmer Assistance-Seeking during Software Development
  • John Anvik and Akalanka Galappaththi. Are Automatic Bug Report Summarizers Missing the Target?
  • Alex Dekhtyar, Bruno da Silva and Karson Slocum. Educating Project Stakeholders: A Preliminary Report
  • Nick Papadakis, Ayan Patel, Tanay Gottigundala, Alexandra Garro, Xavier Graham and Bruno da Silva. Why Did your PR Get Rejected? Defining Guidelines for Avoiding PR Rejection in Open Source Projects
  • Rohit Mehra, Vibhu Saujanya Sharma, Vikrant Kaulgud, Sanjay Podder and Adam P. Burden. Immersive IDE: Towards Leveraging Virtual Reality for creating an Immersive Software Development Environment
  • Abir Bouraffa and Walid Maalej. Two Decades of Empirical Research on Developers’ Information Needs: A Preliminary Analysis
  • Lavinia Paganini and Kiev Gama. A preliminary study about the low engagement of female participation in hackathons

Important Dates

  • Workshop paper submissions due: 22 January 2020 extended: 5 February 2020.
  • Notification to workshop paper authors: 25 February 2020.
  • Camera Ready deadline: 16 March 2020 extended: 7 April 2020.
  • Workshop:
    • Day 1 ("Atlantic"): 1 July 2020 at 16:00-19:00 UTC
    • Day 2 ("Pacific"): 2 July 2020 at 06:00-09:00 UTC

Workshop Themes                                                

Topics of interest are about the human, cooperative, and collaborative aspects of software engineering such as:

  • Software design or engineering philosophies, practices, and tools;
  • Adapting tools or processes to accommodate a range of organizational and cultural situations;
  • Sociological, cultural, psychological, or cognitive aspects of software design or engineering;
  • Managerial or organizational aspects focused on people and their interactions;
  • Teamwork, collaboration, or cooperation in or across various development teams and methodologies;
  • Community-based software development (e.g., Open Source, crowdsourcing, etc);
  • Coordination and knowledge sharing at different scales (e.g., distributed teams, semi-anonymous collaboration, “borderless” teams);
  • Stakeholder participation within and across phases;
  • Processes and tools to support communication, collaboration, and cooperation among stakeholders.

Possible contributions include:

  • Empirical studies of software engineering teams or individuals in situ;
  • Laboratory studies of individual or team software engineering behavior;
  • Novel tools or processes motivated by observed needs or empirical investigations; 
  • Use of analysis techniques or frameworks from disciplines outside software engineering, applied to empirical software engineering topics;
  • Meta-research topics.
Submissions

We have three paper categories: 

  • 8-page full papers.
  • 4-page short papers.
  • 2-page notes.
These different categories offer researchers who are at different stages in their research maturity the opportunity to benefit from workshop participation. Page limits include references. 

All paper and notes submissions will be reviewed by 3 program committee members. The authors of accepted submissions will be asked to join the workshop. We will encourage all participants to submit at least a 2-page note, but the workshop will be open. All interested parties are welcome to register, even without an accepted paper.

Submissions should be made at the following website:

https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=chase2020


Workshop proceedings will be prepared by IEEE CPS and published by ACM. Workshop papers must follow the ICSE 2020 Format and Submission Guidelines (ACM)Accepted papers will be hosted on a password-protected, CHASE-hosted, collaboration site to foster discussion prior to the workshop. The official publication date of the workshop proceedings is the date the proceedings are made available in the ACM Library. This date may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of ICSE 2020. The official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings related to published work.

Given time limitations and the interactive nature of CHASE's workshop format (for instance, see the CHASE 2019 Program), only a subset of papers will be selected for presentations based on their representativeness and potential for generating discussion. All accepted papers may contribute a poster to a poster session. All interested parties are welcome to register, even without an accepted paper.

Workshop Organizers 

  • Yvonne Dittrich, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Fabian Fagerholm, Aalto University, Finland and Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Maria Teresa Baldassare, University of Bari, Italy
  • Igor Wiese, Federal University of Technology - Paraná, Brazil

Program Committee

  • Christoph Becker, University of Toronto, Canada
  • Andrew Begel, Microsoft, USA
  • Matthias Book, University of Iceland, Iceland
  • Fabio Calefato, University of Bari, Italy
  • Tayana Conte, UFAM, Brazil
  • Giuseppe Destefanis, Brunel University, UK
  • Neil Ernst, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Robert Feldt, Chalmers University of Technology and Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Davide Fucci, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden
  • Daniel Graziotin, University of Stuttgart, Germany
  • Lucas Gren, Chalmers University of Technology and The University of Gothenburg, Sweden
  • Hideaki Hata, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Japan
  • Filippo Lanubile, University of Bari, Italy
  • Thomas Latoza, George Mason University, USA
  • Sherlock Licorish, University of Otago, New Zealand
  • Tamara Lopez, The Open University, UK
  • Sabrina Marczak, PUCRS, Brazil
  • Rahul Mohanani, Indraprastha Institute of Information Technology, India
  • James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
  • Jacob Nørbjerg, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark
  • Maria Paasivaara, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark & Aalto University, Finland
  • Gustavo Pinto, UFPA, Brazil
  • Lutz Prechelt, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Germany
  • Fabio Q. B. Da Silva, Federal University of Pernambuco, Brazil
  • Razieh Saremi, Stevens Institute of Technology, USA
  • Anita Sarma, Oregon State University, USA
  • Alexander Serebrenik, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands
  • Helen Sharp, The Open University, UK
  • Margaret-Anne Storey, University of Victoria, Canada
  • Bjørnar Tessem, University of Bergen, Norway
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy
  • Thomas Zimmermann, Microsoft, USA

    Open Science Practices

    CHASE 2020 continues its previous years' experimentation with encouraging authors to use open science to make their research, data and dissemination accessible to anybody in the world with an Internet connection. Here follow our guidelines and recommendations for open access, open data and open source, and signed peer review.


    The following guidelines are recommendations and not mandatory. Your choice to use open science or not will not affect the review process for your paper.

    Open Access

    We encourage CHASE authors to self-archive their pre- and postprints in open, preserved repositories. This is legal and allowed by all major publishers including ACM and IEEE (granted in the copyright transfer agreement), and it lets anybody in the world reach your paper.


    If the authors of your paper wish to do this, we recommend:

    1. Upon submission to CHASE, submit your paper to arXiv.org and choose the arXiv.org perpetual, non-exclusive license to distribute. The paper version at this point is before peer-reviewed, and it is called preprint.

    2. Upon acceptance to CHASE, revise your article according to the peers comments, generate a PDF version of it, and submit it to arXiv.org, which supports article versioning.

    3. Note that you are not allowed to self-archive the PDF of the published article, that is the one you can find in ACM DL or IEEE Xplore. Only self-archive your own generated PDFs.


    We encourage you to use a preserved, archived repository instead of your personal website. Personal websites are prone to changes and errors, and more than 30% of them will not work in a 4 years period.

    Open Data and Open Source

    We encourage authors of accepted papers to make their data public, in order to enhance the transparency of the process and the reproducibility of the results.


    If the authors of your paper wish to do this, we recommend:

    1. Archive their data on preserved archives such as zenodo.org and figshare.com, so that the data will receive a DOI and become citable.

    2. Use the CC0 dedication when publishing the data (automatic when using zenodo and figshare), as explained here.


    Similarly, we encourage authors to make their research software accessible as open source and citable.


    Similarly to our open access, we encourage you to avoid putting the data on your own websites or systems like Dropbox, since more than 30% of them will not work in a 4 years period.

    Signed Peer Review

    Reviewers of CHASE can choose to sign their reports as a first step to experiment with an open peer review process at ICSE venues.

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