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CHASE 2014

7th International Workshop on Cooperative and Human Aspects of Software Engineering
(CHASE 2014)
ICSE 2014 Workshop
Hyderabad, India
June 2 - 3 2014

Attendees at CHASE 2014
CHASE Programme

June 2, 2014
Time Event  Room
(Floor Map)
9:00am-9:30am Introduction and Poster Madness
Helen Sharp, Cleidson DeSouza, Andy Begel
 MR G.02
9:30am-10:15am

Paper Presentations

Chair: Helen Sharp

  • Andrew Ko, Bryan Dosono and Neeraja Duriseti. Thirty Years of Software Problems in the News (20 min)
  • Subramani Ramakrishnan and Vaijayanthi Srinivasaraghavan. Delivering IT Software ADM Projects using Captive Crowd (5 min)
  • Olga Liskin, Fabian Fagerholm, Kurt Schneider and Jürgen Münch. Understanding the Role of Requirements Artifacts in Kanban (20 min)
 MR G.02
10:15am-10:30am Introduction to the Wall  MR G.02
10:30am-11:00am Break  
11:00am-12:30pm

Paper Presentations

Chair: Cleidson DeSouza

  • Rosalba Giuffrida and Yvonne Dittrich. How Social Software Supports Cooperative Practices in a Globally Distributed Software Project (20 min)
  • Sandeep Athavale and Meghendra Singh. Modeling Work-Ethics Spread in Software Organizations (20 min)
  • Kerry Hart and Anita Sarma. Perceptions of answer quality in an online technical question and answer forum (10 min)
  • Pradeep Waychal. The calling of the third dimension (10 min)
  • Sridhar Chimalakonda and Kesav V. Nori. On the Nature of Roles in Software Engineering (5 min)
  • Monde Kalumbilo and Anthony Finkelstein. Linking Strategy, Governance, and Performance in Software Engineering (5 min)
Reflection on Main Themes (15 min)
 MR G.02
12:30pm-2:00pm
Lunch  
2:00pm-3:30pm

Paper Presentations

Chair: Anita Sarma

  • Daniel Varona, Yadira Lizama and Luiz Fernando Capretz. A Comparison of Junior and Senior Software Engineering Students' Personalities (5 min)
  • Maleknaz Nayebi and Guenther Ruhe. An Open Innovation Approach in Support of Product Release Decisions (5 min)
  • Patanamon Thongtanunam, Raula Gaikovina Kula, Ana Erika Camargo Cruz, Norihiro Yoshida and Hajimu Iida. Improving Code Review Effectiveness Through Reviewer Recommendations (10 min)
  • Per Lenberg, Robert Feldt and Lars-Göran Wallgren. Towards a Behavioral Software Engineering (20 min)
  • Shreya Kumar and Charles Wallace. Communication Strategies for Mentoring In Software Development Projects (5 min)
Reflection on Main Themes (15 min)
 MR G.02
3:30pm-4:00pm Break  
4:00pm-5:05pm What are the burning questions in CHASE?
Chair: Helen Sharp
 MR G.02
5:05pm-5:35pm

Joint Session with ICPC and CHASE

Chair: Andrew Begel

  • ICPC: Daniela Steidl and Sebastian Eder. Prioritizing Maintainability Defects based on Refactoring Recommendations(15 min)
  • CHASE: Benjamin Biegel, Julien Hoffmann, Artur Lipinski and Stephan Diehl. U Can Touch This: Touchifying an IDE (15 min)
 MR G.04
5:35pm-6:00pm Joint CHASE/ICPC Poster and Tool Demo Session  MR G.04
6:00pm-7:00pm Break  
7:00pm-9:30pm Joint CHASE/ICPC Banquet  Halls 5 & 6

June 3, 2014
Time Event  Room
(Floor Map)
9:00am-9:30am

Joint Session with ICPC and CHASE

Chair: Andrew Begel

  • ICPC: Sebastiano Panichella, Gerardo Canfora, Massimiliano Di Penta, and Rocco Oliveto. How the Evolution of Emerging Collaborations Relates to Code Changes: an Empirical Study (15 min)
  • CHASE: Igor Steinmacher, Igor Scaliante Wiese, Tayana Conte, Marco Gerosa and David Redmiles. The Hard Life of Open Source Software Project Newcomers (15 min)  
 MR G.04
9:30am-10:30am

Joint CHASE/ICPC Keynote Talk

  • Ed Cutrell. Innovating in India: Designing for constraint, computing for inclusion (60 min)
 MR G.04
10:30am-11:00am Break  
11:00am-11:30am Reflections on the Joint Session and the Wall  MR G.02
11:30am-12:30pm

Paper Presentations

Chair: Yvonne Dittrich

  • Bora Çağlayan, Ayse Bener and Andriy Miranskyy. Factors Affecting Team Evolution During Software Projects (20 min)
  • Xi Ge, Saurabh Sarkar and Emerson Murphy-Hill. Towards Refactoring-Aware Code Review (10 min)
  • Deepa Athle, Aditi Kumar and Vinay Katiyar. A Culture of Involving the Vox Populi for Evolution of Workforce Policy (5 min)
  • Lakshminarayana Kompella. Agile Methods, Organizational Culture and Agility: Some Insights (5 min)
  • Nuno Flores, Ademar Aguiar and Hugo Sereno Ferreira. The concept of "Ba" applied to software knowledge (5 min)
Reflection on Main Themes (15 min)
 MR G.02
12:30pm-2:00pm
Lunch  
2:00pm-2:30pm

Paper presentations and Lightning Talks

Chair: Cleidson DeSouza

  • Srividya A, Anoop T L, Manjunath Gopadi, Kiran V and Madhumathi K.V. Leverage Human Aspects in Test Engineering (5 min)
  • Sachin Kohli. Changing Dynamics of Software Engineering and Mysterious Human Passion (5 min)
  • 5 minute talks from any attendees who have not yet presented their work.
 MR G.02
2:30pm-3:30pm

Interactive Session

Chair: Helen Sharp, Yvonne Dittrich

  • Affinity Diagramming and Reviews of Post It Notes related to burning questions in CHASE and what studies we should undertake to address them.
 MR G.02
3:30pm-4:00pm Break  
4:00pm-5:00pm

Group Presentations

Chair: Andy Begel, Cleidson DeSouza

  • What are the burning questions in CHASE and what can we do about them?
 MR G.02
5:00pm-5:30pm Close  MR G.02

Keynote Talk

Innovating in India: Designing for constraint, computing for inclusion

Abstract

A fundamental tenet of user-centered design is that the needs, wants, limitations, and contexts of end users are central to the process of creating products and services that can be used and understood by the people who will use them. Most of the time these end users aren’t all that different from the people designing the technology. But as the differences increase between designers and the people they’re designing for, understanding and empathizing with users becomes harder and even more important. As we build software for people and communities with vastly diverse backgrounds, cultures, languages, and education, we need to stretch our ideas of what users want and need and how best to serve them.

The Technology for Emerging Markets (TEM) group at Microsoft Research India seeks to address the needs and aspirations of people in the developing world who are just beginning to use computing technologies and services as well as those for whom access to computing still remains largely out of reach. Much of this work can be described as designing for constraint: constraints in education, in infrastructure, in financial resources, in languages and in many other areas. In this talk, I will describe some work from our group that explores how we have tried to manage these constraints to create software and systems for people and communities often overlooked by technologists.

Biography

Ed Cutrell manages the Technology for Emerging Markets (TEM) group at Microsoft Research India. TEM is a multidisciplinary group that strives to study, design, build, and evaluate technologies and systems that are useful for people living in underserved rural and urban communities. The goal of this work is to understand how people in the world's poor and developing communities interact with information technologies and to invent new ways for technology to meet their needs and aspirations. Ed has been working in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) since 2000; he is trained in cognitive neuropsychology, with a PhD from the University of Oregon.

Accepted Papers

Full papers (8 pages)

  • Sandeep Athavale and Meghendra Singh. Modeling Work-Ethics Spread in Software Organizations
  • Benjamin Biegel, Julien Hoffmann, Artur Lipinski and Stephan Diehl. U Can Touch This: Touchifying an IDE
  • Bora Çağlayan, Ayse Bener and Andriy Miranskyy. Factors Affecting Team Evolution During Software Projects
  • Rosalba Giuffrida and Yvonne Dittrich. How Social Software Supports Cooperative Practices in a Globally Distributed Software Project
  • Andrew Ko, Bryan Dosono and Neeraja Duriseti. Thirty Years of Software Problems in the News
  • Lakshminarayana Kompella. Agile Methods, Organizational Culture and Agility: Some Insights
  • Per Lenberg, Robert Feldt and Lars-Göran Wallgren. Towards a Behavioral Software Engineering
  • Olga Liskin, Fabian Fagerholm, Kurt Schneider and Jürgen Münch. Understanding the Role of Requirements Artifacts in Kanban
  • Maleknaz Nayebi and Guenther Ruhe. An Open Innovation Approach in Support of Product Release Decisions
  • Igor Steinmacher, Igor Scaliante Wiese, Tayana Conte, Marco Gerosa and David Redmiles. The Hard Life of Open Source Software Project Newcomers
  • Denise Woit and Kathleen Bell. Do XP Customer-Developer Interactions Impact Motivation? Findings from an Industrial Case Study

Short papers (4 pages)

  • Deepa Athle, Aditi Kumar and Vinay Katiyar. A Culture of Involving the Vox Populi for Evolution of Workforce Policy
  • Sridhar Chimalakonda and Kesav V. Nori. On the Nature of Roles in Software Engineering
  • Nuno Flores, Ademar Aguiar and Hugo Sereno Ferreira. The concept of "Ba" applied to software knowledge
  • Xi Ge, Saurabh Sarkar and Emerson Murphy-Hill. Towards Refactoring-Aware Code Review
  • Kerry Hart and Anita Sarma. Perceptions of answer quality in an online technical question and answer forum
  • Monde Kalumbilo and Anthony Finkelstein. Linking Strategy, Governance, and Performance in Software Engineering
  • Shreya Kumar and Charles Wallace. Communication Strategies for Mentoring In Software Development Projects
  • Subramani Ramakrishnan and Vaijayanthi Srinivasaraghavan. Delivering IT Software ADM Projects using Captive Crowd
  • Patanamon Thongtanunam, Raula Gaikovina Kula, Ana Erika Camargo Cruz, Norihiro Yoshida and Hajimu Iida. Improving Code Review Effectiveness Through Reviewer Recommendations
  • Pradeep Waychal. The Calling of the third dimension

Note papers (2 pages)

  • Srividya A, Anoop T L, Manjunath Gopadi, Kiran V and Madhumathi K.V. Leverage Human Aspects in Test Engineering
  • Sachin Kohli. Changing Dynamics of Software Engineering and Mysterious Human Passion
  • Daniel Varona, Yadira Lizama and Luiz Fernando Capretz. A Comparison of Junior and Senior Software Engineering Students' Personalities

Workshop Overview

Software is created for and with a wide range of stakeholders, from customers to management, from value-added providers to customer service personnel. These stakeholders work with teams of software engineers to develop and evolve software systems that support their activities. All of these people and their interactions are central to software development. Thus, it is crucial to investigate the constantly-changing human and cooperative aspects of software development, both before and after deployment, in order to understand current software practices, processes, and tools. In turn, this enables us to design tools and support mechanisms that improve software creation, software maintenance, and customer communication.

Researchers and practitioners have long recognized the need to investigate these aspects, however, their articles are scattered across conferences and communities. This workshop will provide a unified forum for discussing high quality research studies, models, methods, and tools for human and cooperative aspects of software engineering. 

Workshop Organizers 

  • Helen Sharp, The Open University, UK
  • Rafael Prikladnicki, PUCRS, Brazil
  • Andrew Begel, Microsoft Research, USA
  • Cleidson De Souza, Federal University of Para and Vale Institute of Technology, Brazil

Local Advisory Board

  • Sandeep Athavale, Tata Research Development and Design Centre, Pune, India
  • Yvonne Dittrich, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark and visiting Associate Professor at IIT Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India.


Workshop Theme and Goals 

Software engineering is about making choices and decisions. Some of the critical decisions are informed by multiple viewpoints and experiences acquired from stakeholders. Methods, tools, and techniques have been shaped over many years by best practices learned from experience, but software engineers continually face new challenges and constraints. Addressing these challenges benefits from diverse perspectives, and this workshop welcomes submissions that embrace this variety. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

- Software design philosophies, engineering practices, and tools that leverage human and cooperative aspects of software engineering;

- Adapting tools and processes to accommodate a range of organizational and cultural situations;

- Sociological and cultural characterizations of software engineering (e.g. trust, conflicts, norms);

- Psychological and cognitive aspects of software engineering (e.g. motivation, rewards, personality types);

- Managerial and organizational aspects of software engineering that focus on people and their interactions;

- Software engineering as collaborative work, including behavioral incentives, social networking, communication, coordination, and decision-support tools;

- Teamwork and cooperation in various development methodologies (e.g. agile, spiral, lean, waterfall, RAD);

- Models of community-based software development, such as Open Source, crowdsourcing, and public-private partnerships, and attributes of these models (e.g. recruitment and retention of contributors, risk management);

- Coordination, mutual awareness, and knowledge sharing in small-scale and large-scale software development, e.g. distributed software development, semi-anonymous collaboration, and “borderless” software teams;

- Stakeholder participation in regard to design, ownership, training, degree of involvement, communication, interplay, and influence with developers, sustainability, and deployment; and

- Processes and tools to support communication and cooperation between stakeholders, including software developers, professionals, and customers over the lifetime of a system (requirements, design, development, testing, and maintenance).

Possible contributions include:

- Empirical studies of software engineering teams or individuals in situ, using methods such as ethnographies, surveys, interviews, contextual inquiries, data mining, etc;

- Laboratory studies of individual or team software engineering behavior;

- Novel tools motivated by observed needs, such as new ways of capturing and accessing software-related knowledge, software orienteering systems, communication, collaboration, awareness tools, visualizations, etc;

- Novel processes motivated by empirical investigations; and

- Meta-research topics, such as effective validation of interventions or research methods.


Participation Solicitation and Selection Process We will have three paper categories: 8-page full papers, 4-page short papers, and 2-page notes. These different categories offer researchers who are at different stages in their research maturity the opportunity to benefit from workshop participation. 
All paper and poster submissions will be reviewed by 3 program committee members. The authors of accepted submissions will be asked to join the workshop. We will encourage all participants to submit at least a 2-page note, but the workshop will be open; all attendees will be asked to present an aspect of their work. If appropriate, we will expand the number of participants in the workshop in response to a large number of quality submissions. 
 
Submissions should be made in the following website: 

- Papers should follow ICSE formatting guidelines for technical research: http://2014.icse-conferences.org/format 

Important Dates 

Workshop paper submissions due                     January 31, 2014 (extended deadline)
Notification of workshop paper authors            February 24, 2014
Camera Ready deadline                                     March 14th, 2014
Workshop                                                          June 2nd and 3rd 2014

 


Program Committee

  • Uli Abelein, Heidelberg University
  • Raian Ali, Bournemouth University
  • Vivek Balaraman, Tata RDDC
  • Fabio Da Silva, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco
  • Torgeir Dingsøyr, SINTEF Information and Communication Technology
  • Neil Ernst, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Tor Fægri, SINTEF Information and Communication Technology
  • Fernando Figueira Filho, Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Norte
  • Marco Aurélio Gerosa, University of São Paulo
  • Smita Ghaisas, Tata RDDC
  • Tracy Hall, Brunel University
  • Orit Hazzan, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology
  • Rashina Hoda, University of Auckland
  • Filippo Lanubile, University of Bari
  • Thomas LaToza, University of California, Irvine
  • Walid Maalej, University of Hamburg
  • Sabrina Marczak, PUCRS
  • James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington
  • Lutz Prechelt, Free University of Berlin
  • Kari Rönkkö, Blekinge Institute of Technology
  • Norsaremah Salleh, International Islamic University Malaysia
  • Anita Sarma, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Leif Singer, University of Victoria
  • Bjørnar Tessem, University of Bergen
  • Christophe Treude, McGill University
  • Volker Wulf, University of Siegen
  • Minghui Zhou, Peking University
  • Thomas Zimmermann, Microsoft Research
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